VEDANTA KHUSHI

"KHUSHI" is an AWARENESS CAMPAIGN, launched by Vedanta Resources plc, with a focus to sensitize people towards care for the underprivileged and deprived children – their Nutrition – Education – Health and overall development. Join Khushi on facebook at www.facebook.com/groups/vedantakhushi and send motivational stories at khushi.creatinghappiness@gmail.com . LET US MAKE INDIA A CHILD MALNOURISHED FREE NATION..

SELLING OF NATIONAL FLAG ON THE STREETS, HOW FAR CORRECT ? – “KHUSHI”

Sentiments of millions of Indians are attached with the national flag of India. Should the national flag be sold on the streets, either by street children or by general shopkeepers? Should the national flag be sold only through Khadi Gram Udyog Kendra, which would also generate ample employment opportunities in rural India?

The Supreme Court in 1996 passed a landmark judgement allowing every citizen to fly the national flag with respect, dignity and honour, thus making it a fundamental right. The Union Government approved the recommendations of the inter-ministerial committee headed by P. D. Shenoy and removed the restrictions on the use of the National Flag by all Indian citizens from January 26, 2002.

National Flag has always been a symbol of pride, patriotism and belongingness. Whether it has been pre-independence era or post-independence, a well-laid down decorum has been followed by all Indians across the world. In this the sentiments of solders of India carry a special feeling and the chorus of ‘Jai Hind’ sends a vibration in the entire country making every Indian proud.

Up comes our Independence Day, 15th August, and people start looking for the national flag for hoisting at their houses, offices and even their cars.

“But are people buying these flags out of patriotism or out of mercy on these children? How far this is acceptable?” a question raised by child welfare campaign “Khushi” Child Care Project.  

When the traffic light turns red and all vehicles come to a halt, these children rush to the cars and autos while peddling small flags in their hands. These children don’t even know what they are selling. For them, it’s a mere piece of paper with saffron, green and white stripes that would bring them the money at the end of the day.

“Government is doing so much for the deprived children through Anganwadis but the children still remain on the streets begging. Selling the national flag is equivalent to quick money for them. Their parents are seated in shelter and they send their children for only emotional quotient. It has become another method of extracting money from people who get sentimental by seeing the national flag or deprived children.” Says Pavan Kaushik, Founder of Project “Khushi”. People generally respond by saying that this is a source of income for the kids and we should let them continue selling the national flag. So are we now establishing the fact that child begging is a valid & permissible source of income and we should continue to encourage the increasing number of beggars in the country?” questions Pavan Kaushik. “If we want these children to become assets to the nation, the emotional feeling needs to be curbed for the betterment of these children.”

So where will the common people buy the national flag from? “The best way to get flag without any confusion about colours, sizes, dimensions etc. would be from the government store and nothing better than Khadi Gram Udyog Kendras, says Project Khushi. Even the school teachers can engage the children for making national flag for free distribution in the vicinity. Why do you need to buy them only from the street children?”

The Supreme Court in 1996 passed a landmark judgement allowing every citizen to fly the national flag with respect, dignity and honour, thus making it a fundamental right. The Union Government approved the recommendations of the inter-ministerial committee headed by P. D. Shenoy and removed the restrictions on the use of the National Flag by all Indian citizens from January 26, 2002.

The Flag Code, established in 1950, has been amended after the historic and landmark decision of the Union Cabinet.

The ten rupees from your pocket won’t make much difference to you, but it would make the kid a beggar for life. Do not encourage begging.

VEDANTA KHUSHI - INAUGURATION OF KHUSHI CENTRES AT RAJSAMAND

Honourable Minister for WCD madam Smt. Anita Badhel Ji and Minister PHED Madam Smt. Kiran Maheshwari Ji launched the Khushi centres at Rajsamand on 11th July, 2016. About 600 Khushi centres became active.


VEDANTA KHUSHI - 150 SLUM CHILDREN OF BEDAVAS IN UDAIPUR DEMAND SCHOOL


When Komal, an 8 year old girl from Bedavas was asked why she is not going to school, she replied, how do I go school? I am scared of crematorium, a big well and highway. Why we don’t have school in Bedavas. 

Almost 150 children who participated in a workshop organized by Hindustan Zinc under the Project “Khushi” came up with demand for school in their locality. The parents of these children also requested for a school that can educate these children who are keen to study.


The children in the rural areas face the problem of commutation to the schools. Either the schools are not available in the colony or the children need to travel to school in tough conditions.


With the purpose of inculcating education in poor children, particularly in slum areas, Hindustan Zinc project “Khushi” organized a 2-day workshop on 1st and 2nd July 2016 in Bedavas which falls within the city of Udaipur. About 150 children, in the age-group of 3 to 15 years with almost 70% girls, participated in the workshop which had lessons on literacy, creative skills, moral teachings and nutrition values.

Bedavas has hygiene problem though almost every house has a toilet. As the children came to know that something new is about to happen, almost from every house they came running. A brief was given by Pavan Kaushik, who is the Founder of Project “Khushi” to all the children and their parents about the workshop and how every child has to come to attend the workshop only after taking bath, brushing teeth and properly combed. For this each child was given a tooth brush, a paste, a comb and soap on 1st July itself.

On 2nd July almost all the children came properly dressed and after adhering to the instructions given by “Khushi”. The parents of these children also sat, taking a little distance. 

The workshop began with lessons on literacy. Each child was asked to write their name and few moral values as they were given a note-book, a pencil, a sharper and eraser. Some knew how to write and some were taught. Post class on literacy, the children were given colour books and colours. Each child had to be accurate in colouring the pictures that showed the pattern of colour.



“It is our experience that children in slums and on streets need proper guidance and motivation to educate themselves. When you motivate them to go to school they need schools. The motivation and the infrastructure need to meet or else such workshops may not have long-term impact. In case of Bedavas, all they need is a small school with a teacher and a sustainable infrastructure”, 

- Pavan Kaushik.



The members of the “Khushi” project – Pradhuman Solanki, Maitreyee Sankhla, Devika Gupta, Ankita Das, Mukesh Mundra, Shiv Narayan, Sunil Gothwal and Diksha, advised almost each child on colouring and found that few had an amazing hand on creativity.

In the end, as part of providing nutrition to the children, each child was given a mango and 2 bananas which the child had to eat at the location itself. 


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